How did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

Notes on Night, a book by Elie Wiesel

how did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

were storekeepers. Why was Moshe the Beadle important to Elie Wiesel? . Which notorious SS officer did they meet at Auschwitz? They met Dr. Mengele. studying the historical development and lessons of the Holocaust and other exam - This teacher resource is based on the following edition: Night by Elie Wiesel, Bantam Books, , .. Moshe the Beadle, a foreign Jew who was deported to German-occupied Poland in . On one assignment in , he met the French. Moishe the Beadle - Eliezer's teacher of Jewish mysticism, Moishe is a poor Jew who lives in Juliek - A young musician whom Eliezer meets in Auschwitz.

We must accept it with our eyes and minds wide open. We are going to die, and God alone knows why, on whose account and for what purpose; I do not know. But He demands our lives in sacrifice, which proves that He remembers us, He has not turned His face from us. And so it is with joy-pure, desperate, mad joy- that we shall say to Him: Thy will be done.

Do not therefore beseech His pity. Stifle the cries welling up in your hearts. Be proud, instead, and let your pride explode, and I promise you, I your shepherd, to whom you owe obedience, I promise you that the angels in heaven will lower their heads in shame and will never again praise the Creator of man and his universe, never!

And so Wiesel and his town were indoctrinated without incident into the camps, believing that if their faith endured, they would be saved. Soon the delusions faded and Wiesel began to doubt God. But sooner or later, the seeming meaninglessness of the suffering his people endured had to burst into the consciousness of his seemingly indomitable Jewish faith. Why should I bless His name?

What had I to thank Him for? If God wouldn't save His children, who would? No one believed the rumors of peace and safety. In the hospital at Auschwitz, Wiesel met a man consumed with this kind of despair. He's the only one who's kept his promises, all his promises, to the Jewish people. As hard as they tried to hold on, Wiesel's people were finding it hard to believe in God and what He was allowing to happen. No longer was Wiesel convinced that the Jews were all some part of a greater plan.

Wiesel's mentor in the camp, Pinhas, came to this realization the day before Yom Kippur.

how did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

I have told myself: Now I have had enough, I have reached my limit. If he knows what he is doing, then it is serious; and it is not any less serious if he does not. I was going through the same crisis. Every day I was moving a little further away from the God of my childhood.

He has become a stranger to me; sometimes, I even thought he was my enemy. Others, like Wiesel, were given the burden of carrying the questions with them, never to be answered. Here He is-He is hanging here on this gallows The destruction of his faith in the God of his childhood was complete. No longer did his name bring cries of praise from Wiesel. God seemed unworthy in the face of His worshipers to accept their worship. However, God did not die that day. He is not dead, as the prophet Elijah told Gavriel.

God accepts Wiesel's anger, but He has not died to it.

how did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

As Elijah had said: You think you're cursing Him, but your curse is praise; you think you're fighting Him; but all you do is open yourself to Him; you think you're crying out your hatred and rebellion, but all you're doing is telling Him how much you need His support and forgiveness.

If anything he can question it and feel angry about it. He can even try to change it, by reevaluating God's role in the world. That is what many of those he encountered did once they got over the initial anger. He allowed the pain to continue for His own cruel purposes. This cruel God is the object of Wiesel's anger.

The energy once spent in worship of God was transferred to accusing God, denouncing God, and demanding an explanation from God. Wiesel writes autobiographically in the words of Elisha in Dawn: Ally of God or simply his toy?

It was as if God didn't care what happened anymore. The holiness of the Sabbath was destroyed by this lack of concern. God was either ignoring what was happening or approving of it. Whoever kills, becomes God. Whoever kills, kills God. Each murder is a suicide, with the Eternal eternally the victim. In which case, there can be no searching for reasons behind the Holocaust, for there are none, as Wiesel discovered.

No God ordered the one to prepare the stake, nor the other to mount it. During the Middle Ages, the Jews, when they chose death, were convinced that by their sacrifice they were glorifying and sanctifying God's name.

At Auschwitz, the sacrifices were without point, without faith, without divine inspiration. If the suffering of one human being has any meaning, that of six million has none. Numbers have their own importance; they prove, according to Piotr Rawicz, that God has gone mad. Each person has his own reactions and accusations.

Notes on Night, a book by Elie Wiesel

That God is mad is just one. Gavriel, symbolic of those who escaped long enough to warn others, accuses God of actually having helped the executioners: They might have thrown themselves at his feet and tried to win his pity. That is what others would have done, but not they. A pride that came down to them from an earlier age preventing them from bowing down even before God, who was there behind the executioner.

Gregor told him a story: Standing with his head held high before them, he spoke as follows: I have irrefutable proof in my hands. Judge without fear or sorrow or prejudice. Whatever you have to lose has long since been taken away.

On the day after the trial, He turned the sentence against his judges and accusers. They, too, were taken off to the slaughter. And I tell you this: He wanted the Rebbe to tell him God was as cruel as He seemed.

The Rebbe danced around answering him, until finally, he burst out: That I have no eyes to see, no ears to hear? That my heart doesn't revolt? He's the only one who's kept his promises, all his promises, to the Jewish people.

As hard as they tried to hold on, Wiesel's people were finding it hard to believe in God and what He was allowing to happen. No longer was Wiesel convinced that the Jews were all some part of a greater plan. Wiesel's mentor in the camp, Pinhas, came to this realization the day before Yom Kippur.

I have told myself: Now I have had enough, I have reached my limit. If he knows what he is doing, then it is serious; and it is not any less serious if he does not. I was going through the same crisis.

Every day I was moving a little further away from the God of my childhood. He has become a stranger to me; sometimes, I even thought he was my enemy. Others, like Wiesel, were given the burden of carrying the questions with them, never to be answered. Here He is-He is hanging here on this gallows The destruction of his faith in the God of his childhood was complete.

No longer did his name bring cries of praise from Wiesel. God seemed unworthy in the face of His worshipers to accept their worship. However, God did not die that day. He is not dead, as the prophet Elijah told Gavriel.

God accepts Wiesel's anger, but He has not died to it. As Elijah had said: You think you're cursing Him, but your curse is praise; you think you're fighting Him; but all you do is open yourself to Him; you think you're crying out your hatred and rebellion, but all you're doing is telling Him how much you need His support and forgiveness.

If anything he can question it and feel angry about it.

how did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

He can even try to change it, by reevaluating God's role in the world. That is what many of those he encountered did once they got over the initial anger. He allowed the pain to continue for His own cruel purposes. This cruel God is the object of Wiesel's anger. The energy once spent in worship of God was transferred to accusing God, denouncing God, and demanding an explanation from God.

Wiesel writes autobiographically in the words of Elisha in Dawn: Ally of God or simply his toy? It was as if God didn't care what happened anymore. The holiness of the Sabbath was destroyed by this lack of concern. God was either ignoring what was happening or approving of it. Whoever kills, becomes God. Whoever kills, kills God. Each murder is a suicide, with the Eternal eternally the victim. In which case, there can be no searching for reasons behind the Holocaust, for there are none, as Wiesel discovered.

No God ordered the one to prepare the stake, nor the other to mount it. During the Middle Ages, the Jews, when they chose death, were convinced that by their sacrifice they were glorifying and sanctifying God's name. At Auschwitz, the sacrifices were without point, without faith, without divine inspiration.

If the suffering of one human being has any meaning, that of six million has none. Numbers have their own importance; they prove, according to Piotr Rawicz, that God has gone mad.

Each person has his own reactions and accusations. That God is mad is just one. Gavriel, symbolic of those who escaped long enough to warn others, accuses God of actually having helped the executioners: They might have thrown themselves at his feet and tried to win his pity.

That is what others would have done, but not they. A pride that came down to them from an earlier age preventing them from bowing down even before God, who was there behind the executioner. Gregor told him a story: Standing with his head held high before them, he spoke as follows: I have irrefutable proof in my hands.

Judge without fear or sorrow or prejudice. Whatever you have to lose has long since been taken away. On the day after the trial, He turned the sentence against his judges and accusers. They, too, were taken off to the slaughter. And I tell you this: He wanted the Rebbe to tell him God was as cruel as He seemed.

The Rebbe danced around answering him, until finally, he burst out: That I have no eyes to see, no ears to hear? That my heart doesn't revolt? That I have no desire to beat my head against the wall and shout like a madman, to give rein to my sorrow and disappointment?

Yes, He is guilty. He has become the ally of evil, of death, of murder, but the problem is still not solved. I ask you a question and dare you answer: He is still stuck. Gavriel had his own answer to a cruel God. Nothing had changed by knowing how cruel God was, because God had always been cruel.

He had lectured to Gregor: The first act of Abraham, the first Jew-his readiness to sacrifice his son-was an accusation against God and his injustice.

After that Moses shattered the tables of the Law, in anger not only with his people but with the God of his people. The midrash contains a troubling legend along these same lines. Cain says to God: Why did it have to be me?

Elie Wiesel's Relationship with God

You could have prevented it, but you didn't. All that is left to us of Cain is his curse. They say, yes, I've suffered, but when has a Jew not suffered? He recognizes that his father gives him strength to continue; he acknowledges also that his father at times becomes a burden. Upon their arrival at Buchenwald, Eliezer's father is unable to move. Eliezer brings him soup and coffee, against the advice of other prisoners who counsel him to keep it for himself. Eliezer's father, suffering from dysentery, begs for water.

An SS guard becomes annoyed and knocks him in the head. Eliezer wakes up the next morning and discovers his father's empty bed. He is more relieved than sad. Eliezer is only concerned with food during his remaining months at Buchenwald. On April 5, the evacuation of Buchenwald is ordered. Nazis murder thousands daily. On April 10, Eliezer's block is ordered to evacuate, but it is cut short by air raid sirens.

The next day the camp is liberated. Wiesel nearly dies from food poisoning. He recovers, looks in a mirror, and is shocked by his appearance.

Eliezer's reflection that he resembled a corpse ends the novel with a sense of hopelessness. Despite this hopelessness Wiesel dedicates his life to human rights.

Eliezer - Wiesel gives a first person psychological account of life in a concentration camp. It is important not to confuse the narrator with the author, even though they are the same person.

Eliezer's experiences cause him to question his faith and the existence of a loving, merciful God. Eliezer's the narrator's account leaves the reader with a sense of hopelessness, that humanity is irredeemable, that God has abandoned his creation.

Eliezer's assertions are not that of the author. Elie Wiesel, the older version of Eliezer, the death camp survivor, has dedicated his life to serving mankind and to prevent human rights atrocities, showing that something wonderful can result from incomprehensible suffering. For more on Wiesel's life after his liberation, check out his website.

how did elie meet moshe the beadle auschwitz

Chlomo - Eliezer's father is the only other character who appears consistently. He is a respected member in Sighet before being deported. Eliezer and Chlomo remain together throughout the ordeal. The narrator is honest and frank in his assessment of his father. He needs his father to keep going, but resents having to take care of him at times.

He acknowledges a sense of relief when Chlomo finally dies. One of the more powerful scenes occur towards the end of the novel when Rabbi Eliahou searches for his son during the forced evacuation of Buna. Eliezer recalls seeing Eliahou's son, recalling that he had abandoned his father. Eliezer then utters a prayer, asking for the strength never to do such a thing to his own father.

Moshe the Beadle - Moshe is Eliezer's teacher who is deported along with other foreign Jews in Hungary. He escapes, returns, and warns the town about atrocities he witnessed. Madame Shachter - She is deported in the same cattle car as Eliezer.

She screams of fires the entire time. The passengers mistake her for a mad woman only to discover she is a prophetess as they see the furnaces of Birkenau and the pit of burning babies. Juliek - Eliezer first meets Juliek, a young musician, at Auschwitz.

He hears him play his violin at Gleiwitz toward the end of the narrative. Idek - Idek is a kapo at the electrical parts plant at Buna where Eliezer works.

Eliezer catches him having intercourse with a French woman. Idek whips Eliezer as punishment. Franek - Eliezer's foreman at Buna who steels Eliezer's gold crown with the help of a dentist and a rusty spoon. Josef Mengele - Eliezer encounters Mengele after his arrival at Auschwitz.

Known as the angel of death, Mengele sentenced thousands of Jews to their death. He also oversaw cruel experiments on prisoners. Hilda, Bea, Tziporah - Eliezer's mother and sisters, whom he never sees after entering Auschwitz.

These important quotes from Night will help you remember. Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed.

Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky. As Eliezer arrives at Auschwitz he is greeted by his first selection.

He and his father follow the line that passes a pit of burning babies.

It is difficult for even the most hardened reader not to wince at this passage; it stands out as the most horrible atrocity in a chronicle of horrible atrocities. Wiesel writes three times in this passage "Never shall I forget. Never shall I forget those flames which consumed my faith forever. Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence which deprived me, for all eternity, of the desire to live. Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust.

Never shall I forget these things, even if I am condemned to live as long as God Himself. A continuation of the first quote in this section, the phrase "Never shall I forget" is repeated four more times.

This section of the passage highlights another major theme of the novel--the struggle to maintain faith in a world full of evil. More Important Quotes from Night by Elie Wiesel Use these Night quotes as a reminder to thwart prejudice, racism, hatred, and discrimination, for they are the seeds of human rights violations.